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Icon of the Mother of God "Enthroned"

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Commemorated on March 2

The “Enthroned” (or “Reigning”) Icon of the Mother of God appeared on March 2, 1917, the day of Tsar Nicholas II’s abdication, in the village of Kolomskoye near Moscow, Russia.

In February 1917, an elderly woman named Eudokia saw the Mother of God in a dream telling her to go to Kolomskoye to find a large blackened icon in a church. After this vision occurred to her three times, Eudokia went to Kolomskoye to search for the icon with the priest Nicholas.

In the basement of a church, they found the icon and started wiping off the accumulated dust. They were then able to see the Most Holy Theotokos wearing a crown and sitting on a throne. Immediately, Father Nicholas celebrated a service of Thanksgiving and an Akathist.

News of the icon’s discovery spread throughout Russia, and there were several miracles of healing from physical and mental infirmities. As time went by, the icon renewed itself and became brighter and brighter.

Since the icon was revealed just as the Tsar abdicated, many people believed that the Queen of Heaven had assumed royal authority over the Russian land, and so the icon became known as the “Enthroned” (or “Reigning”) icon. Upon additional research, it was learned that the icon had come from the Ascension Convent in Moscow. In 1812, before Napoleon’s invasion, this icon and others were sent to the Church of the Ascension in the village of Kolomskoye for safekeeping. Apparently forgotten, the icons were never returned to Moscow.

Directory of Chaplains

As of 4-15-2008

Rev. Thomas Palke (retired Chaplain)
3041 Donnington Ct.
Jeffersonton, VA 22724-1731
pastortlp@aol.com

Rev. John A. Shalhoub (Retired Chaplain)
727 Barn St.
Jacksonville, NC 28540-6707
910-455-6374

Rev. Mark W. Sahady
9950 Gazelle Forest
San Antonio, TX 78251-4326
Home: 210-257-9348
Mobile: 210-324-9308
Sahadyfam@yahoo.com

V. Rev. Isaiah Gillette
3799 Man O War Blvd.
Clarksville, TN 37042-4889
Robert.gillette@us.army.mil

Ch, Lt Col H.E. Close III, Wing Chaplain
451 AEW/HC
Kandahar Air Field, Afghanistan DSN: 420-2089
Cell: 079-197-9464

Rev. Fr. Philip Pelikan
United States Marine Corp
135 Hillandale Rd.
Spring Lake, NC 28390

St. Barnabas Antiochian Orthodox Church Receives 25 New Members

stbarnabasSt. Barnabas Antiochian Orthodox Church, Costa Mesa, California, received twenty-five newly illumined faithful into the Holy Orthodox Church on Lazarus Saturday, April 19, 2008.

The Very Rev. Wayne Wilson and the Very. Rev. Michael Reagan officiated as over 75 friends and family members of the former catechumens witnessed the blessed and joyful occasion. St Barnabas previously received 27 new faithful in 2007, 28 in 2006, and 18 new members in 2005.

OCN Premieres New Television Series

ocn3The Orthodox Christian Network's new television series on Orthodox faith and life in the modern world is here! The first episode features an interview with His Grace Bishop Savas of Troas on religious freedom and the Ecumenical Patriarchate.

Watch it now!

The Very Reverend Father Constantine Nasr Visits St. Tikhon's Seminary

clip_image001On Thursday, April 3, the Very Reverend Father Constantine Nasr, Pastor of St. Elijah Antiochian Church in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, visited St. Tikhon's Seminary and offered an evening lecture to the community on the subject of: "The Vision and Mission of the Local Parish."

See photos at http://www.stots.edu/news_080404_1.html.

Support IOCC this Holy Week with a Holy Act

image Constantine Triantafilou, Executive Director of International Orthodox Christian Charities, writes: "Sick and broken persons live among us often as unknown strangers. They may be the refugee family trying to rebuild a life after fleeing their homeland, a mother debilitated by disease with children desperate for food and medicine, or even the clerk at your local supermarket. The words of the Lenten prayer, 'Send but a drop of your mercy, O Christ, on this sick and broken person,' are not just a personal plea, but extend to all those who are sick and broken. ... With but a 'drop' of God’s mercy we, and other hurting people, have the opportunity to be healed, healthy, whole, and holy."

Learn more about IOCC's Lenten Appeal.

Bishop THOMAS Celebrates Lazarus Saturday and Palm Sunday at the Cathedral

On Lazarus Saturday, Bishop THOMAS joined  members of the Cathedral of St. George (Oakland, Pa.) who celebrated with donkey rides, and again on Palm Sunday at the Divine Liturgy.

April 23, 2008 + A Meditation for Holy Friday

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by Fr. Michael F. Massabni

Word Magazine, April 1967

bp.thomas@antiochian.org

WHAT OUR BLESSED LORD did for us during His Holy Week and particularly on Holy Friday is almost beyond comprehension.

It is good for us to approach the foot of the cross, for it is there we learn what the love of God means, what man is really intended to be, and what God’s answer to the world’s problems and the problems of every individual’s life is. There is something pathetically human in His words of longing: "What? Could ye not watch one hour with me?"

There is something sweetly human in His words of appreciation of the loyalty and love to the faithful. "Ye are they which have continued with me in my temptation."

The greatest danger on this day is that we shall so occupy our minds with the sufferings and death of Our Saviour that we shall miss altogether the meaning of His last words to us and the meaning behind His suffering and death.

New Books Available from Conciliar Press

cpbooks Check out new titles from Conciliar Press, including Shepherding the Flock, Lynette's Hope, Moses' Flight from Egypt, Drita, and more.

Lynette's Hope: The Witness of Lynette Katherine Hoppe's Life and Death

lynetteEdited by Fr. Luke Veronis

Lynette fulfilled her dream of being active in ministry right up until her death. In fact, for a month previous to her demise, she vigorously involved herself in the arts and crafts projects and in giving several talks at each of the three girls’ summer church camps held at the St. John Vladimir Monastery. During this time, she also took the time to sing a number of songs on a CD for her children, while writing some letters for future events in the lives of Tristan and Katherine. Exactly eleven days before she died, she even offered a powerful and inspirational talk to the girls about her journey with cancer and preparing for death. Interestingly, it was precisely on this day that her motor skills began to fail.

Read the full article

Buy the book

Listen to an interview with Fr. Luke on Ancient Faith Radio

Memory Eternal, Archbishop Gregory

clip_image001YOUR PRAYERS are requested for the repose of the soul of the newly departed servant of God ARCHBISHOP GREGORY (Afonsky), retired bishop of Sitka and Alaska of the Orthodox Church in America.  His Eminence reposed April 16.

May His Eminence's memory be eternal.

 

Submitted by Bishop BASIL.

New Multimedia Resources For Holy Week From OCN

ocn2The Orthodox Christian Network will be featuring several special programs for Holy Week and Pascha on its Web site (www.MyOCN.net), including beautiful sacred music from the Orthodox Christian liturgical services of Holy Week.

Throughout Holy Week, visitors to www.MyOCN.net will also be able to watch the Holy Week services that will be celebrated at St. Demetrios Church in Fort Lauderdale. These will be available in a live stream, and also available on-demand in a special archive. [Read More]

New Multimedia Resources For Holy Week From OCN

Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. – The Orthodox Christian Network will be featuring several special programs for Holy Week and Pascha on its Web site (www.MyOCN.net), including the first episode of a new Web TV series, beautiful liturgical music for Holy Week and live Web TV broadcasts of every Holy Week service.

"There will be many special features on www.MyOCN.net intended to supplement and deepen everyone's journey through Holy Week," Fr. Christopher Metropulos, Executive Director of the Orthodox Christian Network (OCN), said. "We pray that you will take advantage of these programs, and share them with family, friends, fellow Orthodox Christians and seekers."

This weekend, visitors to www.MyOCN.net will be able to watch the first episode of a new Web TV series called "Tuning In To The Faith." This television series will focus on issues that affect Orthodox Christians in the modern world. The first episode includes an interview with His Grace Bishop Savas of Troas on the persecution of Christians in Turkey, the status of the Ecumenical Patriarchate, the Ecumenical Patriarch's newest book and more.

Also starting this weekend, all of the Internet radio stations produced by OCN will feature beautiful sacred music from the Orthodox Christian liturgical services of Holy Week. Listeners will be able to hear new selections each day. For example, the music that will be playing on Friday of Holy Week will feature hymns from the traditional services celebrated on Great and Holy Friday in Orthodox Churches throughout the world.

Begin Holy Week with A Holy Act


Dear Friend of IOCC,

God’s mercy and our brokenness are themes intimately woven throughout the period of Great Lent. Even more importantly, though, they are present in our daily living. Sick and broken persons live among us often as unknown strangers. They may be the refugee family trying to rebuild a life after fleeing their homeland, a mother debilitated by disease with children desperate for food and medicine, or even the clerk at your local supermarket.
The words of the Lenten prayer, “Send but a drop of your mercy, O Christ, on this sick and broken person,” are not just a personal plea, but extend to all those who are sick and broken. We beg for God’s mercy for ourselves and for other hurting people. With but a “drop” of God’s mercy we, and other hurting people, have the opportunity to be healed, healthy, whole, and holy.

As instruments of God’s mercy you have brought new hope and healing to hurting and broken people like:

CLEO, who lost her home in Hurricane Katrina. Through IOCC’s Volunteer in the Gulf Coast initiative, in cooperation with Habitat for Humanity, she will be moving into her new home this spring in Covington, LA. Teams of IOCC volunteers will continue traveling to the Gulf Coast through July to help others, like Cleo, get back on their feet by helping them construct a new home;

Patriarch Alexy II of Moscow responds to Muslim theologians

Patriarch Alexy II of Moscow and All Russia has published this response to an open letter to Christian leaders written by 138 Muslim theologians:

 

I would like to thank all the Muslim religious leaders and scholars who sent an open letter to representatives of Christian Churches and organizations including the primate of the Russian Orthodox Church.

Christians and Muslims have many similar aims, and we can unite our efforts to achieve them. However, this unity will not occur if we fail to clarify our understanding of each other’s religious values. In this connection, I welcome the desire of the Muslim community to begin a sincere and open dialogue with representatives of Christians Churches on a serious scholarly and intellectual level.

Christianity and Islam are engaged today in a very important task in the world. They seek to remind humanity of the existence of God and of the spiritual dimension present both in man and the world. We bear witness to the interdependence of peace and justice, morality and law, truth and love.

As you rightly put in your letter, Christians and Muslims are drawn together first of all by the commandment of the love of God and the love of one’s neighbor. At the same time, I do not think it is worthwhile for us to identify a certain minimum that seems to fix our convergences in faith and to be theologically sufficient for the individual’s religious life. Any doctrinal affirmation in Christianity or Islam cannot be viewed in isolation from its unique place in the integral theological system. Otherwise, one’s religious identity will be obliterated to give rise to a danger of moving along the path of blending the faiths. It seems to be more fruitful, therefore, to study the integral faith of each side and to compare them.

April 16, 2008: St. Raphael Clergy Brotherhood Memo

+

The Saint Raphael Clergy Brotherhood

of the Diocese of Wichita and Mid-America

"Grace proceeds from everything that is good, but above all from brotherly love."

(St Silouan the Athonite)

Visit our Clergy Brotherhood's Liturgical Resources Web Site at

http://litresswraoc.networks-now.net/

Dear to Christ, Fathers and Brothers:

Blessings to you, your families and your congregations at the mid-point of this sixth and final week of the Great Fast, known as the Week of Palms.

"Lazarus, the friend of Christ, has died today:

he is carried out for burial, and Martha's companions lament in sorrow for her brother.

But Christ comes to him in joy, to show the nations that He is Himself the Life of all."

(1st Troparion of Ode Eight from today's Second Canon at Orthros)

clip_image0011 - YOUR PRAYERS are requested for the repose of the soul of the newly departed servant of God ARCHBISHOP GREGORY (Afonsky), retired bishop of Sitka and Alaska of the Orthodox Church in America.  His Eminence reposed last evening.

Metropolitan Herman To Attend Gathering Marking Pope Benedict XVI's NY Visit (Orthodox Church in America)

April 16, 2008

NEW YORK, NY [OCA Communications] -- His Beatitude, Metropolitan Herman, will be among the Orthodox Christian hierarchs attending an ecumenical gathering marking Pope Benedict XVI's first US visit at Saint Joseph Roman Catholic Church, an historic German parish in New York, NY, on Friday, April 18, 2008.

Accompanying Metropolitan Herman will be Archpriest Alexander Garklavs, OCA Chancellor; Archpriest Leonid Kishkovsky, Moderator of Christian Churches Together in the USA and the OCA’s Director of External Affairs and Interchurch Relations; Priest John Behr, Dean of Saint Vladimir’s Seminary, Crestwood, NY; Archpriest Chad Hatfield, Seminary Chancellor; and Dr. Paul Meyendorff, a member of the North American Orthodox-Catholic Theological Consultation.

Pope Benedict, who arrived in the US on April 15, also is slated to visit Washington, DC before his return to Rome on April 20.

St. Antonina of Nicea

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Commemorated on March 1

The Holy Martyr Antonina suffered at Nicea during the persecutions under Emperor Maximian in the late third century. After being tortured, St. Antonina was thrown into prison, but Maximian could not force her to renounce Christ or offer sacrifice to idols.

Angels of God appeared at the side of St. Antonina, and the executioners ran away. Even when she was placed on a red-hot metal bed, St. Antonina remained unharmed by the power of God. Finally, after additional tortures, she was sewn into a sack and thrown in a lake.

By permission of the Orthodox Church in America (www.oca.org)

St. Domnina of Syria

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Commemorated on March 1

The Virgin Domnina of Syria was a disciple of St. Maron. She built a straw-covered hut in her mother’s garden and lived there as an ascetic, eating only lentils soaked in water.

St. Domnina went to church each morning and evening, covered in a veil so that no one ever saw her face. Her voice, in the words of her biographer Theodoret of Cyrrhus, was “resonant and expressive, and her words were always accompanied by tears.” She peacefully fell asleep in the Lord between 450-460.

By permission of the Orthodox Church in America (www.oca.org)

St. Eudokia of Heliopolis

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Commemorated on March 1

St. Eudokia was a Samaritan, a native of the city of Heliopolis in Phoenicia, who lived during the reign of Trajan in the early second century. She was a pagan and led a sinful life. Her soul was deadened and her heart hardened.

Eudokia awoke one night at midnight and heard singing from the house of a Christian woman who lived nearby. A monk was reading from a book which described the Last Judgment, the punishment of sinners, and the reward of the righteous. The grace of God touched Eudokia’s heart, and she grieved because of her great wealth and her sinful life.

In the morning, Eudokia called on the monk whose rule of prayer she had heard the previous night. His name was Germanus, and he had just returned to his monastery from a pilgrimage to the holy places. Eudokia listened to his guidance, and her soul was filled with joy and love for Christ. She asked Germanus to stay in her home for a week, during which she secluded herself in her room, spending her time in fasting and prayer.

Germanus told her to give away her wealth and to forget her previous life. Shortly thereafter, Eudokia received holy Baptism from Bishop Theodotus of Heliopolis. She entered a monastery and took upon herself strict acts of penitence. The Lord granted forgiveness to St. Eudokia and endowed her with spiritual gifts.

Icon of the Mother of God "Enthroned"

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Commemorated on March 2

The “Enthroned” (or “Reigning”) Icon of the Mother of God appeared on March 2, 1917, the day of Tsar Nicholas II’s abdication, in the village of Kolomskoye near Moscow, Russia.

In February 1917, an elderly woman named Eudokia saw the Mother of God in a dream telling her to go to Kolomskoye to find a large blackened icon in a church. After this vision occurred to her three times, Eudokia went to Kolomskoye to search for the icon with the priest Nicholas.

In the basement of a church, they found the icon and started wiping off the accumulated dust. They were then able to see the Most Holy Theotokos wearing a crown and sitting on a throne. Immediately, Father Nicholas celebrated a service of Thanksgiving and an Akathist.

News of the icon’s discovery spread throughout Russia, and there were several miracles of healing from physical and mental infirmities. As time went by, the icon renewed itself and became brighter and brighter.

Since the icon was revealed just as the Tsar abdicated, many people believed that the Queen of Heaven had assumed royal authority over the Russian land, and so the icon became known as the “Enthroned” (or “Reigning”) icon. Upon additional research, it was learned that the icon had come from the Ascension Convent in Moscow. In 1812, before Napoleon’s invasion, this icon and others were sent to the Church of the Ascension in the village of Kolomskoye for safekeeping. Apparently forgotten, the icons were never returned to Moscow.

St. Euthalia of Syria

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Commemorated on March 2

The Holy Martyr Euthalia lived with her mother and brother in Leontina on the island of Sicily. Euthalia’s mother, a pagan, had suffered for many years with an issue of blood. The Martyrs Alphaeus, Philadelphus and Cyprian appeared to her in a dream and told her she would be healed only if she believed in Christ and was baptized.

After being baptized with her daughter, she was healed of her infirmity. When Euthalia’s pagan brother, Sirmianus, learned of their baptisms, he went into a violent rage. The mother was able to flee, but St. Euthalia confessed herself a Christian and suffered martyrdom. After fierce tortures, the saint was beheaded with a sword.

By permission of the Orthodox Church in America (www.oca.org)

Icon of the Mother of God of Volokolamsk

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Commemorated on March 3

The Volokolamsk Icon of the Mother of God is a copy of the Vladimir Icon at the Dormition Cathedral in Moscow, Russia. The icon was brought from Zvenigorod to the Dormition Monastery of St. Joseph of Volokolamsk on March 2, 1572, during the second week of Great Lent and was solemnly met by Abbot Leonid and the monastic brethren.

It is distinguished by its particular depictions of St. Cyprian (right) and St. Gerontius (left), Metropolitans of Moscow, on the margins. Metropolitan Cyprian was present at the first arrival of the ancient Vladimir Icon of the Mother of God from Constantinople to Moscow in 1395. In 1480, under Metropolitan Gerontius, the Vladimir Icon finally came to Moscow.

In 1588, the Volokolamsk Icon was dedicated at the south gates of the St. Joseph of Volokolamsk Monastery in honor of the Meeting of the Vladimir Icon of the Most Holy Theotokos.

At the end of the 17th century, when a church of the same name was built in Moscow, the gates of St. Joseph of Volokolamsk were rededicated in honor of the holy Apostles Peter and Paul. The Volokolamsk Icon was transferred to its proper place on the iconostasis of the new Cathedral of the Dormition at the St. Joseph of Volokoamsk Monastery.

The icon was ultimately recognized as wonderworking.

By permission of the Orthodox Church in America (www.oca.org)

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