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“The Path of Salvation” Curriculum Research Update

by Carole A. Buleza, Director, Antiochian Orthodox Department of Christian Education
aodce@aol.com

The Plan of Salvation Curriculum Research Update #5   6/23/16

1) Repentance (on the Task 1 Chart: The Five Categories Described” the category of “Repentance” received additional content.)

2) The Task List was sequenced to the end of the project.

3) Scripture has been studied comprehensively in regard to which stories were used in the current texts, and in the Children’s Bible Reader.

4) A database for scripture is under consideration.

Here are general notes to ourselves.

5) As the passion and death of Christ was the kerygma, each year the students will learn aspects of Holy Week, and its services, with the series’ goal of being able to list and describe each of the days.

6) To learn how to pray, quiet will precede the opening and closing prayers. The children will regard their classroom as a holy space and have a time for quiet activity in response to the lesson.

7) The young child has certain needs, in regard to faith, as the research behind CGS shows. A sense of protection, being loved, and belonging. The scriptures and lessons chosen for the young children will have those themes. In addition the themes of the Kingdom (mustard seed) and Light have been shown to be significant. All research from CGS will inform the lessons for this age group.

Our upcoming tasks are as follows:

  • TASK 7: Review the content and methodology of the curriculum of orthodoxsundayschool.com.
  • TASK 8. Complete the list of scriptures used in GOA and OCEC series, The Children’s Bible Reader and the orthodoxsundayschool.com for later determination of which to include.
  • TASK 8a. Create database for scripture.
  • TASK 10. Study of the Divine Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom, and St. Tikhon and list points of correspondence for aspects of spirituality.
  • TASK 10a. Read-through of Fr. Schmemann’s Eucharist for Task 10, and the resource bank for ecclesiology.
  • TASK 11. Resource Table. IN PROCESS. Compile a resource bank for each aspect of spirituality containing its symbol set, which is to say its related imagery, narrative, poetic elements such as juxtaposition, art, hymnography, sensory activity, beauty, chant, and silence, bodily expression, symbol and ritual by researching scripture, service books, the Church Fathers and Mothers, and contemporary writings. Also include a resource bank for theosis, and ecclesiology, undercurrents for all the texts.
  • POST the blank chart, “Resource Table,” on website and Facebook for general assistance. No research is necessary--simply respond with what comes to mind. Submissions can be sent to me, Carole Buleza at the Department of Christian Education: aodce@aol.com.

The preparation is leading up to Task 14:

  • TASK 14: Merge results of Task 11, with 1) the chart from Task 1: “The Five Categories Described,”2) the chart from Task 4: GOA “Conversion” Content, and OCEC “Conversion” Content, 3) Catechesis of the Good Shepherd  (CGS) “Conversion” Content and 4) The Way, The Truth and the Life (WTL) educational standards, to produce the content that will be presented for the category of “Conversion.”

After Task 14, Advisory Groups will be convened to give their opinions of the proposed plan for presenting the content category of Conversion. With their edits in mind, the Task 14 will be repeated for the remaining content categories.

END UPDATE #5


The Plan of Salvation Curriculum Research Update #4 6/8/15

I was able to present my concept paper for the new curriculum at the Chancery recently, and it was favorably received. I have permission to go forward with the project within our Archdiocese. My goal for 2015-16 is to develop the scope and sequence chart for the elementary grades. The Concept Paper mentioned at the Summer 2015 meetings is found in the endnote Attachments, "Walking the Path of Salvation, 4-9-15 (PDF)".

A formational catechesis requires a shift in vocabulary and thought. Whereas the typical lesson's learning objective would ask the student to answer a question correctly, a formational program, has an equal interest in the student describing attitudes, practices, and beliefs. The time with the teacher is not for ingesting large amounts of information, but for a quality time as the "Church," even of the classroom. This is reflected in a second document I am recommending, should you wish to begin to see how formation can be highlighted. It is the result of the first task I set to, and is titled, for short, "[Task I] The Five Aspects Described" PDF (found in the endnote Attachments.)

END UPDATE #4


The Plan of Salvation Curriculum Research Update #3 4/7/15

By Carole A. Buleza, Director, Antiochian Orthodox Department of Christian Education
aodce@aol.com

TOPICS:

  • Tasks Recently Completed: 4, 5, 6,
  • Posting of Charts for Tasks 4, 6
  • Posting of Comparison Chart for GOA and OCEC texts
  • Posting of a new brief version of proposal, Walking the Path of Salvation, 4.9.15
  • What is Next

At this writing, I am pleased with what I was able to produce, but as always, wishing I could have had more time. Yet, it is not the end of the school year. Perhaps by convention time, for those interested, I may have a sample portion of the Scope and Sequence Chart, and a sample lesson. I was able to write my report on the Catechesis of the Good Shepherd. Its content will come into play when I begin to chart.

The content of the Preschool and Kindergarten texts has been analyzed and entered into all charts.

THE REVISED TASK LIST AS OF 4/07/15

  • TASK 1. DONE. List the theological concepts encompassed by each of the five aspects of spirituality: conversion, struggle, liturgy, repentance, and wisdom. See below.
  • TASK 2. DONE. Re-categorize information on the OCEC Chart and GOA Document into a table of the Five Aspects of Spirituality. (The data provided is from the OCEC Scope and Sequence Chart which is not available digitally, and the GOA document which is provided digitally, thankfully, at http://www.goarch.org/archdiocese/departments/religioused/resources/what_your_child_should_know. See below.
  • TASK 3. DONE. Prepare a table that will allow a merging of the GOA and OCEC material for each grade and each aspect of spirituality. See below.
  • TASK 4. DONE. Merge each grade's GOA, OCA material. Determine common themes for grade level, and variations, in order to answer the question, "What are we teaching in grade one about repentance?" etc.
  • TASK 5. DONE. Extend Analysis of OCEC and GOA materials to Kindergarten and Preschool Level.
  • TASK 6: DONE. Thoughtfully review the content and methodology of the Catechesis of the Good Shepherd, post report.
  • TASK 7: Review spiritual content desired from The Five Aspects Described and that which is currently being offered from Tasks 4, 5. Bring in consultants. Very preliminary attempt at finding groupings, threads, inspiration!
  • TASK 8. IN PROCESS. Compile a resource bank for each aspect of spirituality containing its symbol set, which is to say its related imagery, narrative, poetic elements such as juxtaposition, art, hymnography, sensory activity, beauty, chant, and silence, bodily expression, symbol and ritual by researching scripture, service books, the Church Fathers and Mothers, and contemporary writings. Also include a resource bank for theosis, and ecclesiology, undercurrents for all the texts. [I've done searches for "repentance," and "love," "love of God," in regard to conversion, which yielded some quotes from the Fathers and scripture with nice imagery.]
  • TASK 9. IN PROCESS. Determine age-appropriateness, in a general way, for items in the resource bank. Without waiting for this to be complete continue with the other tasks. Choose a grade level as a focal point.
  • TASK 10. Using the resource bank, and the previous scope and sequence charts, determine what is a full and deep understanding of each of the five aspects of spirituality, as well as for the concepts of theosis and ecclesiology. Chart a progression for each from preschool to grade 12. Without waiting for this to be complete continue with the other tasks.
  • TASK 11. Prepare a sample of the new Scope and Sequence chart, for evaluation. Without waiting for this to be complete, choose a grade.
  • TASK 12. Prepare a sample unit of lessons, for evaluation.

POSTINGS

TASK 4: THE MERGING OF GOA AND OCEC LISTINGS PER GRADE, PER ASPECT OF SPIRITUALITY. When I began the column for the merge, the first word I wrote was "Both," to note the common themes, and what both the series taught about, say, repentance in grade 1. To my surprise there was very little in the "both" designation at all. The two different organizing principles are at the root of this, I believe. The OCEC curriculum plan was to present the material in a three-year review cycle. It was heavily focused on the liturgy and the sacraments. The GOA texts, more recently written, chose as their organizing principle a developmental trait of each grade, for example, "sharing" and made that the criteria for choosing the content for the year. So, while I had hoped to find that since both taught the Exodus story in Grade 3, for example, it must be recommended to do so, such was not the case. However, at least I have in one place what each teaches in each grade about the spiritual aspects.

TASK 6: THE CATECHESIS OF THE GOOD SHEPHERD.

The article gives an overview. There is much to be discussed regarding the content that will be posted when I begin to put together drafts of scope and sequence ideas.

COMPARISON OF CONTENT: GOA AND OCEC TEXTS PRESCHOOL TO GRADE 5

It occurred to me that with all the data I had entered and accumulated digitally, it would not be too much more trouble to prepare a side-by-side chart of the two series, and so I have done. This would not have been possible without the person at the American Carpatho-Russian Orthodox Diocese who digitally entered the OCEC listings from the scope and sequence chart. Thank you.

NEW BRIEF VERSION OF PROPOSAL, WALKING THE PATH OF SALVATION 4.9.15

I had reason to produce a brief version of the proposal so I include it here. Of course it gets modified each time I go back into it.

WHAT IS NEXT?

The reward for all the technical labor and charting: the dawn of a new curriculum. Each grade level will be evaluated for what is currently being offered for each aspect of spirituality, in other words, In grade 1, what are the themes of liturgy being offered, repentance, etc. An evaluation will be made for be sub-themes as well, such as scripture; these are termed "curriculum threads." What is currently offered will be placed on the table and compared with the Chart from Task 1. The content offered the children from the Catechesis of the Good Shepherd will be on the table for consideration. A curriculum thread already constructed comes The Way, The Truth and The Life, namely, the 100 basic points of Orthodoxy, made grade-level appropriate.

END UPDATE #3 


The Plan of Salvation Curriculum Research Update #2 11/26/14

By Carole A. Buleza, Director, Antiochian Orthodox Department of Christian Education
aodce@aol.com

TOPICS:

  • Tasks Expanded and Revised
  • Posting of Charts for Tasks 1-3

The busy fall season kept me from the curriculum project, but the long winter ahead promises a lot of time to make great progress! Despite having done the tasks earlier noted the clean-up and checking of the tables took a great deal of time. I edit and then I consider it done, and then I edit. With this update you can see that the original task listing was also edited. I added the task of reviewing Catechesis of the Good Shepherd, which I have done extensively already but not written my report. As the CGS begins with Preschool, the OCEC and GOA listings for preschool will need to be evaluated and charted. Although its methodology is quite distinct, the content listing can be useful for this project. Also, I curtailed the activity of some of the final tasks, for a time, so that I could produce a sample Scope and Sequence Chart, and a unit of lessons, by the end of the school year, God willing.

THE REVISED TASK LIST AS OF 11/18/14

  • TASK 1. DONE. List the theological concepts encompassed by each of the five aspects of spirituality: conversion, struggle, liturgy, repentance, and wisdom. See below.
  • TASK 2. DONE. Re-categorize information on the OCEC Chart and GOA Document into a table of the Five Aspects of Spirituality. (The data provided is from the OCEC Scope and Sequence Chart which is not available digitally, and the GOA document which is provided digitally, thankfully, at http://www.goarch.org/archdiocese/departments/religioused/resources/what_your_child_should_know. See below.
  • TASK 3. DONE. Prepare a table that will allow a merging of the GOA and OCEC material for each grade and each aspect of spirituality. See below.
  • TASK 4. Merge each grade’s GOA, OCA material. Determine common themes for grade level, and variations, in order to answer the question, “What are we teaching in grade one about repentance?” etc.
  • TASK 5. IN PROCESS. Extend Analysis of OCEC and GOA materials to Kindergarten and Preschool Level.
  • TASK 6: Thoughtfully review the content and methodology of the Catechesis of the Good Shepherd, post report.
  • TASK 7: Review spiritual content desired from The Five Aspects Described and that which is currently being offered from Tasks 4, 5. Bring in consultatnts. Very preliminary attempt at finding groupings, threads, inspiration!
  • TASK 8. IN PROCESS. Compile a resource bank for each aspect of spirituality containing its symbol set, which is to say its related imagery, narrative, poetic elements such as juxtaposition, art, hymnography, sensory activity, beauty, chant, and silence, bodily expression, symbol and ritual by researching scripture, service books, the Church Fathers and Mothers, and contemporary writings. Also include a resource bank for theosis, and ecclesiology, undercurrents for all the texts. [I’ve done searches for “repentance,” and “love,” “love of God,” in regard to conversion, which yielded some quotes from the Fathers and scripture with nice imagery.]
  • TASK 9. IN PROCESS. Determine age-appropriateness, in a general way, for items in the resource bank. Without waiting for this to be complete continue with the other tasks. Choose a grade level as a focal point.
  • TASK 10. Using the resource bank, and the previous scope and sequence charts, determine what is a full and deep understanding of each of the five aspects of spirituality, as well as for the concepts of theosis and ecclesiology. Chart a progression for each from preschool to grade 12. Without waiting for this to be complete continue with the other tasks.
  • TASK 11. Prepare a sample of the new Scope and Sequence chart, for evaluation. Without waiting for this to be complete, choose a grade.
  • TASK 12. Prepare a sample unit of lessons, for evaluation.

POSTING OF CHARTS FOR TASKS 1-3:

The charts I mentioned in the first update are finally posted. I have not yet created a blogsite; however, if you wish to contact me, please use cbuleza@comcast.net. I will publish my blogsite on the antiochian.org/christianeducation home page once it is established. These documents are available for downloading and for your comments. I am not certain how interesting they are at this point; I suspect it will be the new lesson material that will draw attention. It would be wise to look at these charts first and then decide if they are something you want to print.

TASK 1: Theological Concepts Encompassed by Each of the Five Aspects of Spirituality.

There are two types of entries in the “Theological Concepts Encompassed by Each of the Five Aspects of Spirituality,” or Task 1, Chart. The first phrases listed convey what spiritual activity the children should practice or experience. Taken together, these encompass my ideas of the category. These concepts were not significantly treated in previous materials. I entered the phrases as learning objectives for clarity sake. As to the GOA and OCEC materials, the concepts taught are noted at the end of the list

TASK 2a: Recategorize the K-5 Entries from the OCEC Scope and Sequence Chart

The OCEC Scope and Sequence Chart entries were reviewed and all were placed into the schema of the five spiritual aspects. The OCEC texts were written over several decades and the chart was a “summary” document. While the material from the OCEC Chart is much less quantity-wise, note that the entries are almost always a single word or phrase, for example, “Loaves and Fishes.” Whereas all the entries from the GOA document are in complete sentences. It is impossible to compare the two. The one observation I was able to make as I did the compiling was that repentance was not given adequate attention by either, and it is a bedrock of our faith.

TASK 2b: Re-categorize the K-5 Entries from the GOA DCE Document, “What Your Child Should Know”

While it would seem logical to use the GOA Scope and Sequence Chart for this task, it is overwhelmingly large. The document, “What Your Child Should Know” gives an adequate sense of what is taught in each grade for the purpose of seeing whether all entries can be recategorized into the five spiritual aspects schema. The GOA series began with a Scope and Sequence Chart, and then wrote texts. It is also more current, being written in the 1990’s. The document, “What Your Child Should Know” entries were reviewed and all were placed into the schema of the five spiritual aspects.

In summary, my question to answer was: “Will all the information, prayers, etc. that we presently teach the children under the category headings currently in use, fit into new, formational category headings?” The answer is yes.

TASK 3. Prepare tables that will allow a merging of the GOA and OCEC material for each grade. There are five pieces, each named similarly:

Each of the five aspects of spirituality has its own table, for example, repentance which will allow a merging of content on that aspect from the various sources: GOA, OCEC per grade. This is in anticipation of the merging, which will allow us to see what is currently being taught about repentance, conversion, liturgy, struggle, and wisdom in each grade level.

Next on the task list is the merging of the OCEC and GOA materials.

END UPDATE #2 


Update #1, September 5, 2014

Many of you know I have been working on the foundations for a new catechetical program for a few years which I have been calling “Catechesis of the Orthodox Way.” It’s now called, “The Path of Salvation,” after a very interesting activity I’ve been doing at trainings for years now. I had planned to give an update on the progress of my research this summer at the Clergy Symposium, but was not able to attend. Instead, I offer it here, including some of the tables of research data noted at the end of this narrative. The “Catechesis of the Good Shepherd” will receive its own report and attachments.

The Orthodox Christian Education Commission

In 2002, two years into my tenure as Director of the Antiochian Department of Christian Education and as Director of the OCEC Curriculum Department, I proposed to the OCEC Board of Trustees, that we revise the curriculum and that we begin by determining the 100 most important prayers, icons, and points of faith that we want the children to know by 8th grade. We did this and those are called the educational standards. The first book of the revision is the 8th grade text, The Way, The Truth, and The Life, published in 2005. The four units of the text are approximately aligned with Fr. Thomas Hopko’s The Orthodox Faith series of four (rainbow) books. It is the text listed for 8th Grade; however, recommended now for use in 8th and 9th grade so the students have more time to absorb the content. Firm knowledge of the faith, and spiritual maturity are the “two hands” I wanted to offer the students with this book and all those to follow, as knowledge alone does not make an Orthodox Christian.

Spiritual Maturity

“Spiritual maturity” has no set definition. Of course, for Orthodox Christians, it is easy to say “theosis.” But that does not have a set definition. The question was simply, “What concepts of our Tradition are essential to the faith, distinctive to Orthodoxy, and useful in nurturing children’s spirituality?” After a great deal of searching through the Philokalia and many spirituality books, and discussion with the OCEC Board of Trustees, the following five aspects of our spirituality were decided upon: conversion, repentance, liturgy, struggle, wisdom. These were included in the lessons of The Way, the Truth and The Life.

As I was not able to continue the revision project due to personal issues. I had years to think about it. I realized that 100 points of faith with spiritual maturity tacked on was backwards. We wanted our children first and foremost to be converted to Christ, to know repentance, to know what it meant to offer themselves and the whole world to God at the Divine Liturgy, to win the struggle with evil, and to be wise with the wisdom of the saints, and then, yes, to articulate their faith. Their spiritual strength is what will count in the end.

In order to build their spiritual strength, the texts must be geared towards the five spiritual aspects that lead to spiritual maturity—conversion, repentance, liturgy, struggle, and wisdom. Each of these will be a unit in their text. That way we know that each year their lessons will intentionally be directed to their formation in spirituality. They will gain depth of spirit; by the time they graduate they will have not just knowledge but a good measure of spiritual maturity.

Personal and Formational

Each of the aspects of our spirituality is personal and formational, not informational or abstract. Hence, the lessons are not abstract, but by their nature they invite self-reflection whether directly or indirectly through the activities. The unit on conversion will have the sub-theme “commitment to Christ and His Church,” and will carry most of what would have been labeled “doctrine” previously. This, too, will be shown to be personal. Each aspect of our faith answers a question, solves a problem in a student’s life, or reveals something amazing about God, humans or the cosmos we live in. When we compose a lesson we start by asking, what’s the use of this lesson from the student’s point of view?

Changing the Scope and Sequence Chart

A word about previous scope and sequence charts. With informational categories such as Ethics, Bible, Church History, Doctrine, as the organizing categories on the scope and sequence charts, the hope was that the student would find the formational language inside the lessons and that, collectively, would be sufficient to form he or she into an Orthodox Christian, which worked for many, thankfully. I am proposing a new configuration for the Scope and Sequence chart. Across the top, the organizing categories are the five aspects of spirituality: “Conversion,” “Repentance,” “Liturgy,” “Struggle,” “Wisdom.”

I have experimented with this configuration, taking the contents of the previous OCEC and GOA charts and placing them within the five categories. All items were able to be placed with only a few instances of constraint; there were instances of overlap, of course.
The result, will be knowledge of the faith in service to spiritual maturity.

When completed and the materials are all written, God willing, we should find students gaining a richer and deeper understanding of conversion, repentance, liturgy, struggle, and wisdom each year of the program. We will be marking the change from an informational catechetical program to a formational program.

Methodology

Among the methodologies will be cooperative learning and experiential learning. Experiential learning includes activities that are kinesthetic, problem-solving and team-building. These are part of the camp program at Antiochian Village. After each there is a quiet reflection time, and then sharing of one’s thoughts. The campers learn a great deal from these and the students in our classes will also. The concept of team building is important to “The Path of Salvation” catechetical program as one of the two recurrent themes is “being Church” (the other is theosis). With an increasingly individualistic culture, it is critical that we turn our attention not just to teaching the students, but to developing a sense of community, or “koinonia,” which was one of the four emphases of the early church. In many of our churches our children need to be encouraged to interact with each other and need to find their prime identity in Church. These team activities are a step in that direction. Further research will be devoted to the development of “being Church.”

Aesthetic Knowing

In traditional Orthodox lands people have an eastern worldview. Instead of deductive reasoning, knowing is primarily intuitive; it is circular and inclusive rather than linear. The eastern mind is content with mystery, in fact, much of our hymnography expresses the mysteries of our faith in paradox, for example, “Today he is suspended on a tree who suspended the earth upon the waters.” Through contemplation of these paradoxes the eastern person reaches wisdom and comes to know God.

During the holy services, the motions, processions, hymns, art, and even silence teach, if one has been attentive to these. We need to sensitize our students so that they are ready to learn and see the world from an eastern perspective. Knowing through the senses, imagery, narrative, poetic elements such as juxtaposition, art, hymnography, beauty, chant, and silence, bodily expression, symbol and ritual—we have never unpacked these aspects of our faith for the children, yet this is incarnational theology! The knowledge of the Orthodox Christian emphatically is “heart” knowledge which comes from experience and prayer.

I believe we have not given our children an authentic Orthodox catechesis, and that many of those who have left, and continue to, do so without adequate basis for making a decision. Our spirituality--“image and likeness,” “God as trinity,” “incarnational theology,” and “theosis”— (just to name a few of the multitude of concepts) is life-giving. Fr. Coniaris has said in many ways, “You are saved from death, yes, but you are saved FOR LIFE, FOR THE KINGDOM, FOR LOVE, FOR THEOSIS!” That is our joy as Orthodox! We have not shared theosis with our students. We have not shared the dignity of the “image and likeness” theology, yet, or perhaps not shared it how it should be shared, which is emphatically, joyfully, every year, and as the seed of our desire to experience theosis. It is just part of the treasure waiting to be unpacked. Although we have shared our faith, and we owe a great debt of thanks to those who have paved the way thus far, I believe this is the time unpack much more of the treasure.

In sum, “The Path of Salvation” catechetical program will have a Scope and Sequence Chart with a sequenced plan directed toward the formational goal of spiritual maturity, or theosis, presented through the eastern worldview of incarnational theology, poetic expression, as well as experiential and kinesthetic interactive and reflective learning.

From This Point Forward

Over the last four years I shared my initial ideas for a new curriculum, prematurely called a “proposal,” but basically that which I have explained above, mainly with priests, and some bishops. The reaction has been very positive. One said, “This is exactly what we need!” Another said, “It is wonderful! We will have to train our teachers in a new way of thinking!”

I also shared my kinesthetic activity, “Walking the Path of Salvation,” which makes tangible the five aspects of spirituality, and is a sample of the curriculum’s methodology. At the end of the Path of Salvation is a large version of the icon of the Hospitality of Abraham, known also as the icon of the Trinity, by St. Andrei Rublev. The reactions I have gotten to “Walking the Path of Salvation” have been rather amazing. Even if as an aside I mention and begin describing it in a training, people begin writing and ask if I can speak slower. When we have done the activity, the participants are asked to quietly reflect afterward, especially of their feelings and thoughts standing before the icon of the Trinity. Typical responses have been, “peaceful,” “in awe” “unworthy.” When asked about the activity in general, many share words to the effect of, “Now I see how it all fits together,” “I can’t wait to do this with my class,” “How soon can you have this new curriculum ready?”
I offer the above paragraphs as preface to what you will be reviewing next if wish to continue monitoring this project. I return to the above comments when my spirits flag and I wonder if the tasks are too great or of anyone in the new re-structuring of the OCEC will understand and support this effort.

For those that are following the research, the reading to this point has been theoretical and rather easy to digest. From this point onwards it will get quite involved.

My research plan is, to my knowledge, unique. The field of Curriculum Development in Orthodox Christian Education, in English, is small. I have copied all (with a few exceptions) of the OCEC Bulletins of the 1950’s and 1960’s and read how passionately they delved into the task at hand. For the Antiochian Orthodox Archdiocese, what preceded the OCEC texts were lessons taken from Bible stories, asking the students “How does this apply to my life?” The point to which I am leading is that no one before has ever tried what I am endeavoring to do. What are the implications? Of course, the project could be declared a failure. The immediate implication and that which I want to emphasize is: the results my efforts produce at this juncture are “raw,” possibly incorrect or ambiguous, and “works in progress.” I will have a blog as soon as I am able to do so, and all who wish to thoughtfully and constructively offer critique are welcome. Watch this page for news of its address.

I would have liked to have been attached in some way to a college or university after presenting my initial ideas. With an M.A. in Religion from The Catholic University of America I am well aware of how research is done correctly, and how grants are sought after and received. Moreover, I would have welcomed the interaction with those in the academic fields whose expertise and general encouragement I might have received. I have received a promise to read results, from a leading Orthodox theologian, when I am at a certain point, and I will take him up on that offer. After a year researching grant opportunities I mentioned my situation to a priest who said to me, “Carole, just do it, even if you can’t get release time, just do it.” By God’s grace, one day at a time.

http://www.goarch.org/archdiocese/departments/religioused/resources/what_your_child_should_know

The Tasks

  • DONE. List the theological concepts encompassed by each of the five aspects of spirituality: conversion, repentance, liturgy, struggle and wisdom.
  • DONE. Re-categorize information on the OCEC and GOA Scope and Sequence charts into a table of the Five Aspects of Spirituality.
  • DONE. Prepare a table that will allow a merging of the GOA and OCEC and Way Truth Life material for each grade.
  • Merge each grade’s GOA, OCA and WTL material.
  • IN PROCESS. Compile a resource bank for each aspect of spirituality containing its symbol set, which is to say its related imagery, narrative, poetic elements such as juxtaposition, art, hymnography, sensory activity, beauty, chant, and silence, bodily expression, symbol and ritual by researching scripture, service books, the Church Fathers and Mothers, and contemporary writings. Also include a resource bank for theosis, and ecclesiology, undercurrents for all the texts. [I’ve done searches for “repentance,” and “love,” “love of God,” in regard to conversion, which yielded some quotes from the Fathers and scripture with nice imagery.]
  • IN PROCESS. Determine age-appropriateness, in a general way, for items in the resource bank.
  • Using the resource bank, and the previous scope and sequence charts, determine what is a full and deep understanding of each of the five aspects of spirituality, as well as for the concepts of theosis and ecclesiology. Chart a progression for each from preschool to grade 12.
  • Prepare a sample of the new Scope and Sequence chart, for evaluation.
  • Prepare a sample unit of lessons, for evaluation.

END UPDATE #1

AttachmentSize
“The Path of Salvation” Curriculum Research Update 7-16 (PDF)18.78 KB
Task 11: RESOURCE TABLE (PDF)306.51 KB
Task 11: RESOURCE TABLE (Word)17.88 KB
“The Path of Salvation” Curriculum Research Update 4-15 (PDF)106.97 KB
“The Path of Salvation” Curriculum Research Update 4-15 (Word)17.07 KB
Task 4a: CONVERSION MERGE (PDF)195.15 KB
Task 4b: STRUGGLE MERGE (PDF)146.38 KB
Task 4c: LITURGY MERGE (PDF)177.32 KB
Task 4d: REPENTENCE MERGE (PDF)144.91 KB
Task 4e: WISDOM MERGE (PDF)154.02 KB
TASK 6: CATECHESIS OF THE GOOD SHEPHERD (PDF)601.34 KB
GOA OCEC COMPARISON Rev. 2-16-17 (PDF)571.29 KB
WALKING THE PATH OF SALVATION 4-9-15 (PDF)398.42 KB
“The Path of Salvation” Curriculum Research Update 11-14 (PDF)549.78 KB
“The Path of Salvation” Curriculum Research Update 11-14 (Word)30.66 KB
TASK 1: THE FIVE ASPECTS DESCRIBED (PDF)423.78 KB
TASK 2a: OCEC SS CHART RECATEGORIZED (PDF)437.82 KB
TASK 2b: GOA DOC RECATEGORIZED (PDF)577.77 KB
TASK 3a: CONV ORTHO CUR (PDF)379.61 KB
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