Antiochian Author Jane Meyer Releases The Woman and The Wheat


In time for Christmas gift giving, SVS Press has released Jane Meyer’s The Woman and the Wheat, the second book in a set that also includes The Man and the Vine. The books tell the story of the making of Eucharistic bread and wine, and are complimented by the artistic skills of illustrator Ned Gannon. To order, click here.

In an interview, author Meyer explained, “the book highlights that time in church when something temporal becomes something eternal.”  Read interview here:

 

1. What was the genesis for this book? I had already written The Man and the Vine, a story about the wine in communion, so just knew that the book on the bread needed to be next! What’s so fun about The Woman and the Wheat is that this story has a true personal connection. I grew up as a baker’s daughter. My father was a baker, and his father before him was a baker, and my great, great grandfather even, was a baker. When we didn’t have shoes, we always had bread. The smell of warm bread in the oven is more than just a comfort for me--it means a childhood, even a livelihood. Now, you bring that bread into the church and all of that earthly meaning is transformed and deepened and made more heavenly. That’s what Christ does with every element of our lives. He touches it, and it becomes more heavenly. Indeed, that’s what He does with us. I could talk about this all day—but I’ll spare you!!!

2. Who are the children you had in mind, during the writing process? I am always thinking of children when I write, especially as I pick and choose particular words. I love words, and hope that my words read more like music than like plain black letters on a page. Children in general respond to music and to the images that the words create. I wrote this book for the kids who are standing in church singing the liturgy and watching, and wondering, and feeling all that is happening. And I wrote this book for those children (and their parents!) who haven’t yet experienced the profundity of a liturgy. Maybe this book will lead them through the front doors, into the narthex, and eventually into the nave. I’d love that…

3. Why does this topic speak particularly to Orthodox children today? This story is not about today. It’s not even about yesterday, or tomorrow. The liturgy—Christ’s body and blood--is timeless. And the heart of The Woman and the Wheat is the eucharist—it highlights that time in church when something temporal becomes something eternal. When I sit in church I’m lost in time and I like that. I’m thankful for one place in this small city of mine, where I can go and forget about time. So, my prayer is that this book will help children, the children of today, and the children of tomorrow, appreciate what a miracle they are partaking of each week…

4. How can we encourage our children to be readers? Readers! Yes, we need readers. I could talk about studies, I could talk about statistics, but the bottom line is that we need well-read, well-educated young people who love Christ, who can enter the world and defend this faith that we love! We can encourage our children to be readers by being readers ourselves. By turning off the television, and the computer. By creating spaces in our homes that are cozy and well lit and filled with quiet. By heading to the library regularly. By having stacks of books nearby… and by cuddling with them, reading to them, and showing love for them by embarking on an adventure together with them, through words…