January 19, 2011 + from Homily VIII


The Homilies of St. John Chrysostom on the Epistle of St. Paul to the Colossians

"And above all these things put on love, which is the bond of perfectness." (Colossians 3:14)

Dost thou see that he saith this? For since it is possible for one who forgives, not to love; yea, he saith, thou must love him too, and he points out a way whereby it becomes possible to forgive. For it is possible for one to be kind, and meek, and humble-minded, and longsuffering, and yet not affectionate. And therefore, he said at the first, "A heart of compassion," both love and pity. "And above all these things, love, which is the bond of perfectness."

Now what he wishes to say is this; that there is no profit in those things, for all those things fall asunder, except they be done with love; this it is which clenches them all together; whatsoever good thing it be thou mentionest, if love be away, it is nothing, it melts away. And it is as in a ship, even though her rigging be large, yet if there be no girding ropes, it is of no service; and in a house, if there be no tie beams, it is the same; and in a body, though the bones be large, if there be no ligaments, they are of no service.

For whatsoever good deeds any may have, all do vanish away, if love be not there. He said not that it is the summit, but what is greater, "the bond"; this is more necessary than the other. For "summit" indeed is an intensity of perfectness, but "bond" is the holding fast together of those things which produce the perfectness; it is, as it were, the root.

Ver. 15. "And let the peace of God rule in your hearts, to the which also ye were called in one body; and be ye thankful."

"The peace of God." This is that which is fixed and steadfast. If on man's account indeed thou hast peace, it quickly comes to dissolution, but if on God's account, never. Although he had spoken of love universally, yet again he comes to the particular. For there is a love too which is immoderate; for instance, when out of much love one makes accusations without reason, and is engaged in contentions, and contracts aversions.

Not this, saith he, not this do I desire; not overdoing things, but as God made peace with you, so do ye also make it. How made He peace? Of His own will, not having received anything of you. What is this? "Let the peace of God rule in your hearts."

If two thoughts are fighting together, set not anger, set not spitefulness to hold the prize, but peace; for instance, suppose one to have been insulted unjustly; of the insult are born two thoughts, the one bidding him to revenge, the other to endure; and these wrestle with one another: if the Peace of God stand forward as umpire, it bestows the prize on that which bids endure, and puts the other to shame.

How? By persuading him that God is Peace, that He hath made peace with us. Not without reason he shows the great struggle there is in the matter. Let not anger, he saith, act as umpire, let not contentiousness, let not human peace, for human peace cometh of avenging, of suffering no dreadful ill. But not this do I intend, he saith, but that which He Himself left.

He hath represented an arena within, in the thoughts, and a contest, and a wrestling, and an umpire. Then again, exhortation, "to the which ye were called," he saith, that is, for the which ye were called. He has reminded them of how many good things peace is the cause; on account of this He called thee, for this He called thee, so as to receive a worthy prize.

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St. Euthymius the Great - January 20

Troparion of St. Euthymius, Tone 4

Rejoice, O desert that has not given birth, be glad, thou who hast not travailed. For a man of desires has multiplied thy children of the Spirit; he has planted them in piety and reared them on continence to the perfection of virtues. By his prayers, O Christ our God, save our souls.

Kontakion of St. Euthymius, Tone 8

In thine august birth creation found joy, and in thy divine memory it receives the gladness of thy miracles. Grant these richly to our souls, O Euthymius, and cleanse the stains of our sins that we may sing:  Alleluia.